PUBLICATIONS        

Sussman, G. & Higgins-Dobney, C.L. (2016). The planned obsolescence of tv journalism. In R. Maxwell (Ed.) The Routledge Companion to Labor & Media (pp. 230-241). New York, New York: Taylor & Francis

Higgins-Dobney, C.L. & Sussman, G. (2013). The growth of TV news, the demise of the journalism profession.  Media, Culture & Society, 35(7), 847-863

Higgins, C.L. & Sussman, G. (2007). Plugola: News for profit, entertainment, and network consolidation. In T.A. Gibson & M. Lowes (Eds.) Urban Communication: Production, Text, Context (pp. 141-164).  Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

Higgins-Dobney, C.L. (2017). Technology, flexible labor, corporate expectations, and the local TV newsroom worker. Digital Poster presented at the Broadcast Education Association (BEA) Conference. Las Vegas, Nevada.

Higgins-Dobney, C.L. (2016). News work: Local television news employees, corporate culture, and the impact on community reporting. Presented at the Broadcast Education Association (BEA) Super-Regional Conference. University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.

Sussman, G. & Higgins-Dobney, C.L. (2015). The planned obsolescence of television journalism. Presented at the International Association for Media and Communication Research. University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Higgins-Dobney, C.L. (2015). News work: The impact of corporate newsroom culture on news workers & community reporting. Speed Networking event. University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM), Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Higgins, C.L. & Sussman, G. (2012). Impacts of conglomeration and new technology on the local TV newsroom. Presented at What is television? A conference exploring the past, present, and future of television. University of Oregon, Portland, Oregon.    

DISSERTATION IN PROGRESS

News work: The impact of corporate newsroom culture on news workers & community reporting

MASTERS THESIS

Does the “News” Come First? Social Responsibility, Infotainment, and Local Television Newscasts in Portland, Oregon: A Content Analysis.

CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS

Labor (or, if you prefer, labour) conditions in local television newsrooms.

The political economy of the broadcast journalism business and its impact on what is presented to the audience as  “news.”

How educators prepare the next generation for the ever-changing field of journalism.

Broadcast journalism and all that goes along with it!

 

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